HomeArticlesIssue 9: Intermittent fasting

Issue 9: Intermittent fasting

Intermittent fasting (IF) is one of the hottest topics in nutrition right but is there science to support this age-old ritual? We unearthed some of the most interesting, science-backed content on IF to help guide your eating decisions.

Edwina Clark, MS, RD, CSSD
2 mins
Intermittent fasting (IF) is a popular practice among Elo members and one of the trendiest topics in nutrition right now. Increasingly, people are turning to this age-old ritual for weight loss, focus, and longevity. But is the science there? 
Preliminary data indicates that IF is helpful for cutting weight, improving cellular health, and controlling cholesterol, but much of the evidence to date is based on animal models and small clinical trials. Moreover, important details like the best IF protocols, most responsive groups, and long-term implications of fasting, remain unclear. 
Nevertheless, we thought it would be helpful to dish up some of the best evidence-based reads on fasting. Whether you're an IF devotee or a skeptic, this is a topic worth keeping an eye on.

1. Does IF hurt endurance performance? 

Fed still appears to be the best approach for peak performance, but fasting may have less of an impact on moderate-intensity activity. Just don't expect any PRs. [READ MORE]

2. Calorie counting vs. IF for weight loss.

New research suggests that reducing calorie intake on a consistent basis is superior to intermittent fasting for shedding unwanted pounds.

3. What is fasting-mimicking and does it work?

Prolon's fasting with food protocol has become a popular choice for weight loss. We reviewed the science behind their 5-day plan consisting of bars, soups, and supplements. [READ MORE]

4. Pros and cons of fasting for women.

Although some ladies may benefit from fasting, others may find that IF wreaks havoc on their hormonal health and reproductive function. [READ MORE]

5. Meet Silvia, Elo's Principal Nutritionist

Silvia comes to Elo with almost a decade of experience in nutrition coaching, and previously led the wellness program for Stanford's Distinguished Careers Institute (DCI). However, she wasn't always a nutritionist. Read about Silvia's interesting background HERE
Silvia Segerstrale headshot
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